Seven Tips for Getting Up Early to Write (Even if You’re a Night Owl)

by | Feb 10, 2021 | 4 comments

For many years, while I was working full time, I got up early to write before my kids woke up and things got hectic. As a die-hard night owl, adjusting to that schedule was rough. I’m not gunna lie. It took me about eighteen months to settle in, but I know now that I went about it all wrong.

If you’re a writer trying to eek out an hour a day for your work, consider getting up early. Here are seven things I learned along the way that might make the process a little easier:

1.  You don’t have to be a morning person.

I was absolutely NOT a morning person when I started. It was painful, no question about it, but eventually I got used to it because I had to. If your writing is important enough, you’ll get used to it. Here’s how:

2.  PRE-PROGRAM YOUR COFFEE.

If you own a coffee maker, it probably has a delayed start function. Take 10 minutes, google the make and model to find the owners manual, and read up on how to set it to start brewing ten minutes before your alarm goes off.

 You want the coffee to be ready to drink when you drag yourself out of bed. Hot coffee can be a powerful motivator.

3.  Give yourself a foot massage.

I know this sounds strange, but sometimes, when I was too tired to get up and even the promise of hot coffee wasn’t enough, I would pinch each toe for a few seconds. Somehow a quick little foot massage helped drag me into consciousness. I don’t know why. It just did.

4.  DO IT (ALMOST) EVERY DAY.

For the first two years, I thought I was going easy on myself by only getting up early to write every other day. Boy did I get that one wrong. Do it every day, or at least every workday. Just put it in your head that this is how you start workdays. It will be a drag at first, but eventually you will adjust. It will get easier. I struggled terribly with early mornings until I started waking up at 5am six days a week. I know, it sounds counterintuitive, but it’s easier to settle into it if you do it (almost) every day. (For the record, I’m a big believer in having one or two mornings a week to sleep in. It gives you something to look forward to, and it’s oh so sweet when you’re waking up so early every other morning. Trying to wake up at 5am every morning forever will just lead to burn out.)

5.  ESTABLISH A ROUTINE

When you wake up super early to write you will be groggy. You will not want to think about anything too much until the coffee kicks in. For me, this meant establishing a routine. I would fill my mug and sit at the kitchen table with my coffee and my journal. I would aim to fill one page of the journal with whatever came to mind – seriously anything. It usually took me about half an hour, and I would notice my pen moving faster as the coffee kicked in. Then, I would close the journal, set the mug aside, and attack my writing.

6.  GO TO BED EARLY.

Depending on how old you are, and how demanding your days can be, getting up super early on a regular basis will start to wear you down if you don’t compensate by going to bed a little earlier. As a night person by nature, I never used to get tired until after midnight. But I knew I needed sleep, so I started brushing my teeth and getting into bed earlier. For many weeks I would sit up and read until my usual crash-out time, but eventually the exhaustion caught up and I started falling asleep earlier. It’s embarrassing for a self-proclaimed night person to admit to going to bed at 9, but you’re a writer, damn it, and you’re doing it for your art.

7.  SET AN END TIME.

For me, writing time ended at 6:30 or when the kids woke up. Whichever came first. If you’re a parent, and/or if you’re working a full time job, you will need to set an end time.

Write as much as you can in your allotted time and then pat yourself on the back. Whatever else happens that day, you wrote. And that is a fucking victory.

 

      Happy Writing!

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<a href="https://writersatlarge.com/riff/author/april-davila/" target="_self">April Dávila</a>

April Dávila

April Dávila received her undergraduate degree from Scripps College before going on to study writing at USC. She was a resident of the Dorland Mountain Arts Colony in 2017 and attended the Squaw Valley Community of Writers in 2018. In 2019 her short story “Ultra” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. A fourth-generation Californian, she lives in La Cañada Flintridge with her husband and two children. She is a practicing Buddhist, half-hearted gardener, and occasional runner. 142 Ostriches is her first novel.

4 Comments

  1. Hope

    Great read. I guess it might have been an answer to a prayer. Because I want to write. So really I just need to be start.

    Reply
  2. Daryl Sumners

    Bellissimo lavoro,bravo continua cosi!!

    Reply
  3. Google

    Usually posts some extremely intriguing stuff like this. If youre new to this site.

    Reply
  4. Alpha Seelig

    Thank you so much for the great article, it was fluent and to the point. Cheers.

    Reply

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